Brothers in Arms (and it’s not what you think)

5 02 2019

There is a trailer, an IMDB-entry, you can buy it at Amazon Video or on BluRay and DVD. Aaaand there is even a Twitter account.

Charlie Sheen narrates, as cast and crew share their personal experiences making the Academy Award winning film, Platoon. This non-union, low budget, independent film was cast almost exclusively with young, unknown actors making their first film. Together they share their first hand accounts of the grueling boot camp, Oliver Stone’s “unique” directing style, and the brutal filming conditions that together forged their eternal brotherhood.

413yu62nvgl._sy445_
ETA: Bought a copy. Let’s see if it’s worth the immense shipping fee from the USA.

Actions

Information

5 responses

17 03 2019
JM

Hey, I finally got around to doing that timeline:

Let me know what you think!

20 03 2019
JP

Hey, that’s some great work! What I find interesting is the discrepancy between the final message of the movie (that seems to very personal) and the fact that Stone he prolonged his tour. Did you find anything about why he did it?

PS: I think you have a little typo: it’s A’shau Valley, isn’t it?

4 04 2019
JM

First, thanks for the typo correction! Fixed! 🙂

As for the extension, yes I was surprised when I first read that too! The only tidbit I could find about it was in Steven Jay Rubin’s Combat Realism: 1945-2010, who writes that Oliver chose three more months in Vietnam instead of serving six months on duty stateside, as he wanted to be done with the Army when he was done with Vietnam. The last 12 days were on a mountaintop in the rain (which Oliver repeats in the Zoller Seitz book) he returned to Saigon, then left 8 days later for stateside. Unfortunately Rubin does not quote Oliver on that nor include a footnote as to where he got that info.

Famously, tours of duty in Vietnam for the Army were 12 months (“365 and a wakeup, oh lord”). I couldn’t find anything about extensions in the Vietnam era on the web. There’s this in Wikipedia on general tours of duty: “Tours of duty can also be extended involuntarily for service members, such as in September 2006, when the tour of duty was extended for 4,000 US military personnel in Iraq.[8] They were increased up to 15 months for tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.” The only other info I could find about extensions in the modern Army was about soldiers signing up for them sometimes in fall for a pay bump (fiscal year ends in October).

So my guess would be: either the Army was short handed for combat troops at that time (certainly possible in late ’68) and offered current soldiers who’d served their 365 either a six month extension stateside, or a three month extension in country (to make that more appealing than stateside), or there was some financial incentive that appealed to Oliver. (Note his DEROS on that morning report from October 17, 1967 is still September 1968.)

1 05 2019
JM

Hi JP, I recently watched an interesting documentary from 1992 on Showtime, “Oliver Stone: Inside/Out.” Unfortunately when I went just now to post the Youtube link to you, I saw it had been taken down. 😦 Such a shame because the doc had some interesting Vietnam photos I’d never seen before (and great behind the scenes footage of JFK which Stone was shooting at the time).

Other interesting stuff: we see Stone visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington and look up Juan Elias’ name and find him on the Wall. He seemed shocked at finding out how young Elias really was and genuinely touched by the visit. He kept repeating, “It’s so sad, so sad…”

When talking about Elias and Barnes he again said that wasn’t Barnes’ real name. There was a startling moment when he was talking about their different approaches and said, “I loved them both.”

4 05 2019
JM

Hi JP, I recently watched an interesting documentary from 1992 on Showtime, “Oliver Stone: Inside/Out.” Unfortunately when I went just now to post the Youtube link to you, I saw it had been taken down. 😦 Such a shame because the doc had some interesting Vietnam photos I’d never seen before (and great behind the scenes footage of JFK which Stone was shooting at the time).

Other interesting stuff: we see Stone visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington and look up Juan Elias’ name and find him on the Wall. He seemed shocked at finding out how young Elias really was and genuinely touched by the visit. He kept repeating, “It’s so sad, so sad…”

When talking about Elias and Barnes he again said that wasn’t Barnes’ real name. There was a startling moment when he was talking about their different approaches and said, “I loved them both.”

Leave a Reply to JM Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.




%d bloggers like this: